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Blockchain and Social Media | A Match Made in Heaven?

Social media platforms of the new future will be very different from what we have today, that is if the current trends are to sustain. Social networking is not an old phenomenon. It has picked up in the last two decades. At the dawn of the internet, as it started to gain mainstream adoption in the early 90s, the only thing we could do was view information and send messages via email. Later on, as the decade progressed, online search started to become a big thing, and later microblogging caught on, albeit at a small scale.

Instead of just viewing information, the idea of sharing and forming platforms started to grow. America Online (AOL) could be viewed as heralding this era when it enabled the creation of member profiles that were searchable. Nonetheless, major strides in social networking were not made until after the dot com bubble burst in 2000. The new era of social networking sites began. Friendster was launched in 2002, then Myspace in 2003, LinkedIn also in 2003, and Facebook in 2004. Even Google launched Orkut, a social networking site, in 2004. It has since shut it down.

Facebook and Myspace became the two leading social networking sites until Facebook dominated. Facebook specifically did a few things differently from Myspace that worked—starting by targeting university students, understanding its core product value, etc.—and these things eventually allowed it to increase engagement and capitalize on ads.

Later came Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, and Snapchat—all with one core idea—giving a platform for people to share their daily life experiences. User-generated content became the main thing. To monetize the platforms, the only viable model was through allowing companies to place ads while people used the service for free. As people generated more content, engagement grew. As time went by, more customer data was being analyzed and tracked in order to give better ad placement than TV and other traditional platforms could offer.

This has been the dominant model for social media platforms, but major problems have arisen from this model.

Hacking and data leaks have been a huge problem, perhaps the most concerning. Facebook allows third-party developers to create applications that work on Facebook’s platform. Recently, we learned about how this has been abused, exposing users’ records, names, passwords, comments, etc. It started with the Cambridge Analytica scandal. LinkedIn also had a password breach.

Too many ads can lead to a bad customer experience. Many social media companies, in a bid to increase revenue, found more ways to customize ads. The length of time a person stays on a platform became the main metric, and all efforts have been done to increase staying time. The centralized control of social media companies means that they optimize for engagement and ease of use in order to make better targeting for advertisers. Sometimes this comes at the expense of users.

Even with increased staying time, the majority of the value generated accrues to the platforms themselves and not the users who are the creators of the content.

Fake accounts, spamming, and bots are also becoming a menace for current social media platforms. For example, Facebook recently said that in the first quarter of 2019, it had removed 2.2 billion fake accounts. That is a high figure, even though Facebook says it is able to flag fake accounts within minutes of registering. In addition, how to manage privacy in an ad-based model is still a challenge.

Finally, there’s online harassment and hate speech. This has always been a problem but has especially become so in the last few years. The only way a user can really deal with this is by reporting the account; beyond that, the jury is still out on how best to solve the issue of online harassment and hate speech.

>> Tether (USDT) Accidentally Creates $5 Billion in Crypto

It Started with Bitcoin

The launch of bitcoin in 2009 sought to change the way we view and use money. Satoshi outlined the vision of a decentralized, censorship-resistance internet-based money. Bitcoin has acted as a currency and medium of exchange, enabling borderless mechanisms to store and exchange value. The idea is to reduce centralized control and the single point of failure, which can be prone to manipulation and locks out many, especially those in countries with failing monetary regimes and a lack of ways to transfer value cheaply across national borders. This aspect of decentralized networks has caught on and is now being extended beyond money to other areas.

Ethereum later came in 2015, introducing the idea of a platform to build and launch decentralized applications. Hundreds of use cases have evolved from here: fundraising (ICOs), prediction markets, data storage, etc.

Social media is one of the use cases. As outlined above, some of the major challenges of existing social networks can be solved by decentralized networks if they work as envisioned.

  1. Reduce powerful corporations controlling huge chunks of data;
  2. Deal with problems of bots and fake accounts;
  3. Incentivize good behavior through tokens—this could reduce spamming/trolling;
  4. Enable contributors to earn based on the content they share;
  5. A payment system.

Let’s look at some of the existing projects trying to solve the problems currently plaguing social media.

Steemit

Steemit was an early blockchain startup that showcased how the technology could be used to benefit content creators. As a decentralized alternative to platforms like Reddit, users are able to create accounts and start posting content. When it becomes popular, they earn Steem tokens.

This way, spam content is eliminated. Users can exchange tokens with other cryptocurrencies or fiat on exchanges. Started in 2016, it has now amassed 1 million users. However, it has not yet achieved scale to rival any of the existing social media platforms.

Voice

Block.one, the company behind the EOS cryptocurrency, announced on the first anniversary of EOS mainnet on June 1, 2019, that it was launching a social media platform called Voice.

The information available from the launch says that the platform will seek to eliminate bots through a special authentication process when onboarding users. If successful, that would eliminate one of the main challenges of managing fake accounts and bots on traditional social media.

The Voice token will be at the center of the network whereby users receive Voice tokens based on the content they share and by collecting likes. The token cannot be obtained in any other way, such as mining, but only through the platform, and it can be spent promoting users’ own posts.

Facebook’s Libra

Even the existing social media platforms such as Facebook are realizing that this is not a passing façade.

Facebook first came out in support of blockchain in 2018 when its CEO said that they were looking into blockchain as possible solutions for their privacy woes. Later in December 2018, it has heavily been reported by various new platforms such as Bloomberg that, finally, Facebook is launching its own cryptocurrency, Libra. The announcement came on June 18, 2019. and Libra is expected in 2020.

Libra is to be in the form of a stablecoin for facilitating payments on Facebook’s platforms. According to the whitepaper, the project is a collaboration of 27 other partners which form the Libra Association; each partner contributes $10 towards the project and hosts a node. Facebook formed Calibra, which is to be Facebook’s own representative in the Libra Association. David Marcus, head of Calibra, says that members are expected to grow to 100 by the time the launch.

Libra is meant to facilitate payments across the world. Facebook would benefit by enabling its 2.2 billion users to have a way to make payments easily and cheaply. Further down the line, Libra could be used to enable users to pay for ads on the platform.

Nonetheless, Facebook has received a lot of backlash from lawmakers in both Washington and Europe. Reports also indicate that China could launch its own version to compete with Libra.

This is not the first time Facebook has experimented with digital tokens, having launched Facebook credits in 2009 to enable users to purchase items such as games on the site before terminating the project after it failed to gather traction. However, with the rise of cryptocurrency tokens, could this social media platform have now found a way?

>> John McAfee Reiterates His $1 Million by 2020 BTC Price Prediction

Telegram

Telegram, the messaging platform, is also building the TON, or Telegram Open Network, which will enable users to undertake e-commerce.

Telegram raised $1.7 billion in 2018, making it one of the biggest ICOs ever. In February this year, The Block reported that the project was 90% complete and would be launched in Q3 of 2019.

Telegram aims to launch GRAM, the native token powering the TON. To add to messaging, the TON is expected to enable payments via GRAM, a decentralized marketplace, and peer-to-peer file hosting as explained in its technical whitepaper. The project is speculated to be in testing mode currently, and more details will be availed when the project is fully launched later this year.

With 200 million monthly users already, the launch of TON could radically change messaging as Telegram is already one of the most widely used non-blockchain based messaging platforms, particularly for ICOs, mainly because of its privacy features. If TON is successful, this could solve the monetization challenge of the platform, since the founder Pavel Durov has publicly said that Telegram will never allow ads as a method of monetization.

From Now On

For the majority of the new and upcoming blockchain-based social media platforms, incentivizing good behavior, payment channels, and rewarding users for sharing content seems to be the core tenets of blockchain-influenced social media.

Until now, the only viable way to make money by being on social media as a user has been growing a following or fan base to high numbers, having some level of influence, and then endorsing or sponsoring products through which the user can earn a commission based on set metrics.

However, for the majority of the remaining users, there is no incentive not to troll, spam, and so forth. With tokens, the idea is to reward those who spend more on the platform, sharing updates, pictures, stories, and the like. Social media giants such as Facebook have come under pressure for generating billions of dollars in ad revenue based on content created by users while users do not benefit directly. Native platform tokens could unlock this problem. The extent to which this will work remains to be seen, but at the core, it challenges the fundamentals of how not only social media but also by extension, the internet has been built so far.

Privacy, payments, and control over data seem to be at the core of how the future of social media is going to work.

Time will tell.

Featured image: DepositPhotos © yourg

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crypto scams

Blockchain Firm AmaZix is Tackling Crypto Scams on Telegram

When something becomes popular, illegal activity tends to follow. The cryptocurrency market knows this all too well, which is why AmaZix this week opened up its “moderation bot” so crypto scams can be booted from Telegram, a popular messaging app.

Here’s what we know.

Telegram Crypto Scams

On Wednesday, AmaZix, a blockchain advisory firm, said it was opening up access to its “moderation bot,” in an attempt to boot the crypto scams that have found their way to the Telegram app. For the past two years, AmaZix has used the bot to create a blacklist of Telegram users. According to CoinDesk, this list has more than 50,000 banned users. Many of these users were banned for impersonating admins and posting fake offers. Users were also banned for posting fake giveaways and links for other websites.

“Through our service, which takes the form of a bot that is added to a group, we offer free, real-time threat intelligence for Telegram. As soon as a user posts malicious content on any of the groups we monitor, they are automatically banned from all our groups, and added to our global blacklist.”

Creating this blacklist will do a lot of good in terms of preventing further crypto scams on Telegram; but what if someone gets wrongly blacklisted? If that happens, there is no need to panic. According to Dejan Horvat, COO of AmaZix, if someone is blacklisted and they didn’t do anything wrong, that individual can report it to the team. Then, the team will “investigate the situation and remove you from the blacklist if appropriate.”

>> Bitcoin (BTC) Recovers as Momentum Returns on Strong Technical

Takeaway

What do you think about AmaZix trying to remove the various crypto scams on Telegram? Do you think creating a blacklist is a smart move, or will it cause more problems?

Let us know your thoughts in the comments below!

Featured image: PixaBay

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Vitalik Buterin Makes Fortune 40 Under 40

We know their names, but that’s not always enough. To appreciate the young in the world of business, Fortune, a multinational magazine, publishes its ’40 under 40′ list every year. Yesterday, the 2018 Fortune 40 under 40 list was released—and four crypto players made it. Vitalik Buterin makes Fortune 40 under 40, plus more!

Crypto Makes it on the 2018 Fortune 40 Under 40

When Fortune’s under 40 rankings first started, it was to show off the giants of the dot-com boom. But things are different now, with changes being sparked by the 2008 financial crisis.

Now, Fortune still lists those under 40, but instead of showing their wealth, the magazine highlights their influence, achievements, and power—three qualities that a majority of the crypto industry has (if it were up to us, the list would be full of crypto players), but only four made this year’s list.

So, who are the lucky four? 

1. Brian Armstrong Makes Fortune 40 Under 40: CEO of Coinbase 

Brian Armstrong, 34, is ranked 20th, a drop from where he placed in 2017 (he was ranked 10th). 

Achievements: Fortune talks about how Armstrong is moving Coinbase in the direction of becoming “the Google of crypto.”

The magazine noted that Coinbase has a ways to go, but Armstrong is doing all the right things, like investing in upstarts, as well as making acquisitions. 

2. Vitalik Buterin Makes Fortune 40 Under 40: Ethereum Co-Founder 

Born in Russia, Vitalik Buterin, 24, made his debut on the Fortune 40 under 40 in 2016. This year Vitalik Buterin makes Fortune 40 under 40, moving from 31st place to 22nd. 

Achievements: You can’t argue that Buterin isn’t influential (and, at times, controversial) and Fortune recognizes this. The magazine discussed how Ethereum, his blockchain platform, now has a market value of $48B, making it one of the most valuable crypto networks in the world.

3. Pavel Durov Makes Fortune 40 Under 40: Telegram Founder 

Making his debut on the 2018 Fortune 40 under 40, Pavel Durov, 33, is ranked 25th. It’s not a surprise that Durov is ranked, considering it has been one hell of a year for the Russian developer. 

Achievements: Durov is on Fortune’s list because back in March, his company Telegram finished two $850M ICOs. In the end, Telegram’s total ICO earnings came to $1.7B. 

4. Vlad Tenev and Baiji Bhatt Make Fortune 40 Under 40: Robinhood Founders

Again, not a surprise to see these two crypto industry representatives on the 2018 Fortune 40 under 40.

Co-CEOs of Robinhood, a stock trading app, Tenev, 31, and Bhatt, 33, are both ranked 24th. 

Achievements: The above pretty much sums it up. But if you want more, get a load of this: Robinhood is trying to expand crypto trading support and has already raised $363M in funding in an attempt to do so.

The Takeaway

Overall, I would say the 2018 Fortune 40 under 40 is spot on. Some of these crypto players are on the list for a second or third time, while others are making their debuts. 

Either way, the people who have taken the industry to the point that it is at now are getting recognized—and that’s nice to see.

What do you think of the 2018 Fortune 40 under 40 list? Should more crypto players be ranked?

>> Genesis’ Peter Gabriel Invests in Blockchain Startup

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