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Satoshi Nakamoto

Satoshi Nakamoto

A Closer Look at Satoshi Nakamoto

Satoshi Nakamoto is the alias used by a person or group who authored the Bitcoin whitepaper. Satoshi is the creator of the first release of the Bitcoin protocol and blockchain database. The alias was used in email and forum correspondence from August 2008 through April 2011.

History

Satoshi’s first appearance in the world was the publication of the Bitcoin whitepaper to several mailing lists on October 31, 2008. Beginning in 2007, Satoshi wrote the initial codebase for Bitcoin and released it on Sourceforge on January 9, 2009. On January 3, 2009, Satoshi created the ‘Genesis Block’ of Bitcoin containing the text, “The Times 03/Jan/2009 Chancellor on brink of second bailout for banks.” This text is in reference to the headline of the front page of “The Times” newspaper from England and Satoshi’s dissatisfaction with Fractional Reserve banking.

For two years, Satoshi was very active in creating and promoting Bitcoin, including:

From mining Bitcoin in the early days, addresses belonging to Satoshi have amassed approximately one million Bitcoins.

His last verifiable communication to the world was in April 2011, simply stating:

“I’ve moved on to other things. It’s in good hands with Gavin and everyone.”

Attributed Innovations

Both Bitcoin and the Blockchain Protocol have been attributed to Satoshi Nakamoto, as well as Predicative Script.

Possible Identities of Satoshi Nakamoto

There has not been any verifiable proof as to whom the individual really is. The following individuals have all been thought potential Satoshi Nakamotos at one time or another.

Dorian Nakamoto

A high profile article in Newsweek penned by Leah McGrath Goodman suggested that Dorian was Bitcoin’s creator. He is a Japanese American man with the birth name of Satoshi Namakoto. He was trained as a physicist at Cal Poly Pomona and worked on classified defense projects. He has also done work for Citibank. He was laid off twice in the 1990s and was libertarian. In an interview, he responded to a question by stating:

“I am no longer involved in that and I cannot discuss it. It’s been turned over to other people. They are in charge of it now. I no longer have any connection.”

Later, it was revealed that he had no connection to the cryptocurrency, and he misunderstood the question as relating to his work with Citibank and not Bitcoin. Within twelve hours of the article being released, Satoshi Nakamoto’s account on the P2P Foundation website was hacked and posted the message:

“I am not Dorian Nakamoto.”

This message was posted by the hacker due to the vulnerabilities in GMX’s email system.

>> The Most Common Misconceptions About Bitcoin: Breaking the Mold

Hal Finney

Hal lived a few blocks from Dorian Nakamoto. Between this and a writing analysis, Hal is the closest possible candidate for being Satoshi Nakamoto. However, there is one event that discredits Hal as being Satoshi. In January 2009, when Hal and Satoshi were working on the early versions of Bitcoin, Hal encountered an error and posted a debug log to the mailing list:

“Hi Satoshi – I tried running bitcoin.exe from the 0.1.0 package, and it crashed. I am running on an up to date version of XP, SP3. The debug.log output is attached. There was also a file db.log but it was empty.”

Satoshi acknowledges the bug and releases 0.1.2 with a fix:

“All the problems I’ve been finding are in the code that automatically finds and connects to other nodes, since I wasn’t able to test it in the wild until now.  There are many more ways for connections to get screwed up on the real Internet.”

In the early days of Bitcoin, Bitcoin sent and received transactions directly between clients using IP addresses. The debug log reveals the IP address of three users connected to the IRC channel. On January 10, 2009, there were only two people working on the project at that time. Hal and Satoshi.

Tracing the IPs reveals Hal’s IP address and an IP address out of Van Nuys, California on a DSL connection.

Nick Szabo

Skye Grey, a blogger, linked Nick to the Bitcoin whitepaper using some writing analysis. Nick is a decentralized currency advocate and published a paper on “bit gold.” This is where things get iffy, vis-a-vis Szabo being Satoshi. Based on correspondence between Hal and Satoshi, while Bitcoin was being created, Satoshi was unaware of Bit Gold. Between January 2009 and March 2009, the reference to Bit Gold was added to the Bitcoin.org website.

Craig Wright

On December 8, 2015, Wired magazine wrote that Craig:

“Either invented bitcoin, or is a brilliant hoaxer who very badly wants us to believe he did.”

Craig had established an elaborate scheme of website postings and email correspondences to create the appearance that he and David Kleiman were Satoshi Nakamoto. A very lengthy article written by Sam Biddle and Andy Cush for Gizmodo on December 8, 2015, unpacks Craig Wright’s assertions and business dealings leading to many more questions than answers.

In May of 2016, Craig Wright went on several interviews with the BBC, The Economist, and GQ and claimed to provide technical proof that he is Satoshi. Gavin Andresen originally stated that Craig Wright was Satoshi before retracting his claim.

Despite his assertions, the clearest proof that he is Satoshi has never been provided—none of the original wallets with Bitcoins mined by Satoshi have ever been moved in any way.

Featured image: DepositPhotos © info@crashmedia.fi

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John McAfee

John McAfee Says He Will Reveal Who Satoshi Nakamoto Is

According to a Bloomberg report, notorious crypto enthusiast and antivirus software maker, John McAfee, claims to have spoken with Bitcoin creator Satoshi Nakamoto. Further, he says he will reveal this person’s identity.

John McAfee Claims to Know Satoshi Nakamoto

When this reveal will be, however, remains unclear, despite McAfee initially telling Bloomberg he would expose Nakamoto “within a week.” McAfee said yesterday that the controversy his announcement would bring could damage his efforts to fight extradition to the US. Saying in a Twitter post:

“Releasing the identity of Satoshi at this time could influence the trial and risk my extradition […] I cannot risk that. I’ll wait.”

But in speaking to Bloomberg, McAfee said the following:

“I’ve spoken with him, and he is not a happy camper about my attempt to out him.”

However, it remains skeptical whether his claim is true—so many others have attempted to track down the Bitcoin pioneer and failed.

Satoshi Nakamoto

Satoshi Nakamoto is the pseudonym given to the person or people who created Bitcoin and spawned an entire currency. There have been multiple theories as to who the creator of the digital coin is, with each one causing hot debate. No one who has come forward with a suggestion has ever been able to prove it and theories are often quickly discredited. The mystery has gone so far as to suggest Tesla CEO Elon Musk is Satoshi Nakamoto—something he himself quickly denied.

Other claimants include Bitcoin SV founder Craig Wright and Ethereum co-founder Vitalik Buterin.

All we know is if McAfee’s claim is true, then Nakamoto is a man living in the US.

>> Bitcoin Price Surges to a New 2019 High: $5,600 and Climbing

Trust McAfee

In speaking to Bloomberg, McAfee reminded people that he has spent a lifetime tracking down hackers, meaning he is well capable of tracking down Nakamoto.

“People forget that I am a technologist […] I am one of the best,” he furthered.

What do you think? Do you believe McAfee?

Featured Image: DepositPhotos © photoagents

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Crypto World Cup Third Place

63 games down and one more to go. Earlier, the Crypto World Cup third-place match took place, and, after a middling match, Satoshi Nakamoto secured the title of third place.

Some argue that the third-place game in the Crypto World Cup means nothing; after all, it’s not like the winning crypto player gets a bronze medal, like in the Olympics.

We disagree. We think getting to the third-place match in the Crypto World Cup is something to be proud of — even when being there means both crypto players lost in the semifinals. 

Crypto World Cup: Satoshi Nakamoto Comes in Third 

Satoshi Nakamoto and Justin Sun faced off for third place in the Crypto World Cup, not long after Nakamoto lost 1-0 in its semi-finals match to Charles Hoskinson, and Justin Sun lost, in what was one of the most heartbreaking games of my life, to Charlie Lee in extra-time.

>> Justin Sun vs. Charlie Lee Semi-Final

But despite the disappointment, despite the tears, both Satoshi Nakamoto and Justin Sun walked onto the pitch today, heads held high. 

Final Score: Satoshi Nakamoto 2-0 Justin Sun 

This game pretty much favored Satoshi Nakamoto, who scored within the first four minutes, and kept the 1-0 lead right through to halftime.

In the second half, it looked like Justin Sun may have been on the verge of a comeback. Satoshi Nakamoto was receiving yellow card after yellow card, an indication that he was feeling the pressure, and starting to get frustrated with Justin Sun. 

But a comeback never happened. In the 70th minute, it could have happened; Justin Sun almost scored, twice, in a span of two minutes. However, because of Nakamoto’s strong defense, the ball never met the back of the net.

12 minutes later, Satoshi Nakamoto knocked the ball into the bottom left-hand corner from inside the box, making the score 2-0. 

And that was it. Injury time did nothing; it was evident Justin Sun had given up after the second Nakamoto goal went in. 

No Time For Tears 

Like we said earlier, it’s a big deal to have even gotten this far. Satoshi Nakamoto was full of surprises throughout the entire tournament, and Justin Sun not only made history getting as far as he did, but he also provided a nation with hope.

>> Crypto Finals Preview 

It’s a big deal to us, and, we hope Satoshi Nakamoto and Justin Sun feel the same. Now, however, all they can do is spend time with their loved ones, and, perhaps, watch the Charlie Lee vs. Charles Hoskinson game tomorrow (check back then!)

So congratulations to Satoshi Nakamoto for coming in third at the Crypto World Cup, and Justin Sun, you should feel extremely accomplished! 

Oh, and one more thing: there’s always the Crypto Euros, two years from now! 

Featured Image: whoateallthepies

 

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The Crypto World Cup Semi’s

After a stonking-ly good match that had everyone on the edge of their seat, we finally have our first victor for the Crypto World Cup Final due to play on Sunday!

Charles Hoskinson has earned his worthy place with his 1-0 defeat of Satoshi Nakamoto.

Nakamoto’s fans were obviously left devastated at the defeat; he had not reached the semi-finals in 32 years — riding on under-dog hopes, this could have been his year.

If you haven’t been following and want to see who has taken part and been booted out already, go here!

Semi-Final: Charles Hoskinson 1-0 Satoshi Nakamoto

Let’s get into this game.

It was an early second half goal, headed in by Hoskinson, combined with an all-round brilliant defensive wall which meant he was simply the superior side.

Nakamoto showed his talented attacking abilities, and with an all-round 64% possession, he was by no means out-ranked. But he could not find the back of the net against such an experienced and strong side; Hoskinson has reached the Crypto World Cup final three times in the last six cups.

The 1-0 defeat was nearly 2-0, when Hoskinson pulled off one of the best assists in Cup history — but he bottled it when it mattered — a fumble with the keeper sent the ball away from the net. You still have to appreciate such skill, and the lone goal was enough in the end to secure the victory. 

Overall, Nakamoto had more possession, but Hoskinson had 19 shots on goal, as opposed to Nakamoto’s 10. A suggestion that once he was on the ball, Hoskinson was more definitive on where to put it.

>>The Crypto World Cup: Meet the Players!

Nakamoto was a worthy side, and the match was by no means a walk in the park. He had gotten so far and it is a bitter end to his Crypto World Cup journey. No doubt his flag will fly low in his home tonight.

We have our victor though! The man of the moment is Charles Hoskinson who flies to Moscow on Sunday!

Who will he face? It’s either Justin Sun or Charlie Lee. 

Game on!

Featured Image: Dnaindia.com

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