#1 Source for BlockChain News

Category archive

Nick Szabo

Satoshi Nakamoto

A Closer Look at Satoshi Nakamoto

Satoshi Nakamoto is the alias used by a person or group who authored the Bitcoin whitepaper. Satoshi is the creator of the first release of the Bitcoin protocol and blockchain database. The alias was used in email and forum correspondence from August 2008 through April 2011.

History

Satoshi’s first appearance in the world was the publication of the Bitcoin whitepaper to several mailing lists on October 31, 2008. Beginning in 2007, Satoshi wrote the initial codebase for Bitcoin and released it on Sourceforge on January 9, 2009. On January 3, 2009, Satoshi created the ‘Genesis Block’ of Bitcoin containing the text, “The Times 03/Jan/2009 Chancellor on brink of second bailout for banks.” This text is in reference to the headline of the front page of “The Times” newspaper from England and Satoshi’s dissatisfaction with Fractional Reserve banking.

For two years, Satoshi was very active in creating and promoting Bitcoin, including:

From mining Bitcoin in the early days, addresses belonging to Satoshi have amassed approximately one million Bitcoins.

His last verifiable communication to the world was in April 2011, simply stating:

“I’ve moved on to other things. It’s in good hands with Gavin and everyone.”

Attributed Innovations

Both Bitcoin and the Blockchain Protocol have been attributed to Satoshi Nakamoto, as well as Predicative Script.

Possible Identities of Satoshi Nakamoto

There has not been any verifiable proof as to whom the individual really is. The following individuals have all been thought potential Satoshi Nakamotos at one time or another.

Dorian Nakamoto

A high profile article in Newsweek penned by Leah McGrath Goodman suggested that Dorian was Bitcoin’s creator. He is a Japanese American man with the birth name of Satoshi Namakoto. He was trained as a physicist at Cal Poly Pomona and worked on classified defense projects. He has also done work for Citibank. He was laid off twice in the 1990s and was libertarian. In an interview, he responded to a question by stating:

“I am no longer involved in that and I cannot discuss it. It’s been turned over to other people. They are in charge of it now. I no longer have any connection.”

Later, it was revealed that he had no connection to the cryptocurrency, and he misunderstood the question as relating to his work with Citibank and not Bitcoin. Within twelve hours of the article being released, Satoshi Nakamoto’s account on the P2P Foundation website was hacked and posted the message:

“I am not Dorian Nakamoto.”

This message was posted by the hacker due to the vulnerabilities in GMX’s email system.

>> The Most Common Misconceptions About Bitcoin: Breaking the Mold

Hal Finney

Hal lived a few blocks from Dorian Nakamoto. Between this and a writing analysis, Hal is the closest possible candidate for being Satoshi Nakamoto. However, there is one event that discredits Hal as being Satoshi. In January 2009, when Hal and Satoshi were working on the early versions of Bitcoin, Hal encountered an error and posted a debug log to the mailing list:

“Hi Satoshi – I tried running bitcoin.exe from the 0.1.0 package, and it crashed. I am running on an up to date version of XP, SP3. The debug.log output is attached. There was also a file db.log but it was empty.”

Satoshi acknowledges the bug and releases 0.1.2 with a fix:

“All the problems I’ve been finding are in the code that automatically finds and connects to other nodes, since I wasn’t able to test it in the wild until now.  There are many more ways for connections to get screwed up on the real Internet.”

In the early days of Bitcoin, Bitcoin sent and received transactions directly between clients using IP addresses. The debug log reveals the IP address of three users connected to the IRC channel. On January 10, 2009, there were only two people working on the project at that time. Hal and Satoshi.

Tracing the IPs reveals Hal’s IP address and an IP address out of Van Nuys, California on a DSL connection.

Nick Szabo

Skye Grey, a blogger, linked Nick to the Bitcoin whitepaper using some writing analysis. Nick is a decentralized currency advocate and published a paper on “bit gold.” This is where things get iffy, vis-a-vis Szabo being Satoshi. Based on correspondence between Hal and Satoshi, while Bitcoin was being created, Satoshi was unaware of Bit Gold. Between January 2009 and March 2009, the reference to Bit Gold was added to the Bitcoin.org website.

Craig Wright

On December 8, 2015, Wired magazine wrote that Craig:

“Either invented bitcoin, or is a brilliant hoaxer who very badly wants us to believe he did.”

Craig had established an elaborate scheme of website postings and email correspondences to create the appearance that he and David Kleiman were Satoshi Nakamoto. A very lengthy article written by Sam Biddle and Andy Cush for Gizmodo on December 8, 2015, unpacks Craig Wright’s assertions and business dealings leading to many more questions than answers.

In May of 2016, Craig Wright went on several interviews with the BBC, The Economist, and GQ and claimed to provide technical proof that he is Satoshi. Gavin Andresen originally stated that Craig Wright was Satoshi before retracting his claim.

Despite his assertions, the clearest proof that he is Satoshi has never been provided—none of the original wallets with Bitcoins mined by Satoshi have ever been moved in any way.

Featured image: DepositPhotos © info@crashmedia.fi

If You Liked This Article Click To Share

!function(f,b,e,v,n,t,s)if(f.fbq)return;n=f.fbq=function()n.callMethod?
n.callMethod.apply(n,arguments):n.queue.push(arguments);if(!f._fbq)f._fbq=n;
n.push=n;n.loaded=!0;n.version=’2.0′;n.queue=[];t=b.createElement(e);t.async=!0;
t.src=v;s=b.getElementsByTagName(e)[0];s.parentNode.insertBefore(t,s)(window,
document,’script’,’https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/fbevents.js’);
fbq(‘init’, ‘894368744004449’);
fbq(‘init’, ‘447469122301599’);
fbq(‘init’, ‘1763072463990516’);
fbq(‘track’, ‘PageView’);

(function(d, s, id)
var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];
if (d.getElementById(id)) return;
js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id;
js.src = “http://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.6”;
fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);
(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’));

Crypto World Cup Day 9

It’s Crypto World Cup day 9 and round 1 of the world cup is giving us our worthy victors; by June 28th we should have our top 16.

Today’s matches saw World Cup favorite Cameron Winklevoss defeat Dan Larimer in a cruel last-minute win. We also had Barry Silbert and Nick Szabo meet face-to-face but everyone held their breaths as Jamie Dimon and David Schwartz both scrambled to find that last minute goal that would sway the victory in their favor. 

If you don’t know them all yet, meet the players of our Crypto World Cup!

Match 1: Cameron Winklevoss 2-0 Dan Larimer

Cameron Winklevoss came alive in the final 2 minutes of this game. Up until the 90th minute, the match was tied 0-0. It looked like Winklevoss was set for another draw in the first group stages of this tournament. But to everyone’s disbelief, it was in extra stoppage time where he rolled up his sleeves and got back in this game scoring two late goals. Now Winklevoss leads this group and looks set for the next stage of the cup. Larimer is going to be out now as he sits point-less at the bottom of the table.

Match 2: Barry Silbert 2-0 Nick Szabo

It was a surprise to all but then, it wasn’t. Nick Szabo had failed to show up in his match against Charlie Lee and it appears the same happened today. What’s going on Szabo? Silbert, on the other hand, shot ahead with a 2-0 win over Szabo which has secured him second place on the group D board.

Match 3: Jamie Dimon 1-2 David Schwartz

No doubt that it was the most exciting match today. It was last minute, it was exciting, it was unexpected but somehow David Schwartz managed to break away and net a 2-1 victory over his competitor Jamie Dimon. Dimon had looked superior in the first half – he was no easy foe. The match was tight with the two teams equalizing for the majority of the game. Dimon has been denied a penalty when the teams were drawn at 1-1. This was a controversial decision which will no doubt be talked about over the coming days. Schwartz now leads Group E alongside Winklevoss with 4 points to his name. 

>> Check Out Crypto World Cup Day 8!

Tune in to the upcoming games and we start to see the leaders emerge from each group! The competition is heating up. Who will come out on top of the Crypto World Cup??

Featured image: Sportingnews

If You Liked This Article Click To Share

!function(f,b,e,v,n,t,s)if(f.fbq)return;n=f.fbq=function()n.callMethod?
n.callMethod.apply(n,arguments):n.queue.push(arguments);if(!f._fbq)f._fbq=n;
n.push=n;n.loaded=!0;n.version=’2.0′;n.queue=[];t=b.createElement(e);t.async=!0;
t.src=v;s=b.getElementsByTagName(e)[0];s.parentNode.insertBefore(t,s)(window,
document,’script’,’https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/fbevents.js’);
fbq(‘init’, ‘894368744004449’);
fbq(‘init’, ‘447469122301599’);
fbq(‘init’, ‘1763072463990516’);
fbq(‘track’, ‘PageView’);

(function(d, s, id)
var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];
if (d.getElementById(id)) return;
js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id;
js.src = “http://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.6”;
fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);
(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’));

Meet the Players, Guess Who Wins – Crypto Currency News

It’s time for the next saga in our crypto game adventures – the Crypto World Cup! The world of crypto has a lot of big names. It’s about time they faced off with one another. Who will come out on top?

Let’s meet the players!

Crypto World Cup: Who’s Who

Our crypto representatives come from all walks of crypto – token developers, crypto advocates, analysts, even some crypto naysayers.

All of our fabulous crypto representatives were assigned randomly to a country playing in the FIFA World Cup. Their progress in the Crypto World Cup depends entirely on how well the country does in the FIFA World Cup.

Crypto World Cup

Crypto World Cup

CryptoYoda is Russia. CryptoYoda is a crypto enthusiast and technical analyst, providing insight into crypto prices and movements.

David Sønstebø represents Saudi Arabia. Sønstebø is the co-founder of IOTA, the 9th largest cryptocurrency in the world.

Erik Voorhees is Egypt. As the CEO of ShapeShift, Voorhees is well-versed in the intricacies of crypto, but how is he with soccer?

Brad Garlinghouse is Uruguay. A big name in crypto, Garlinghouse is the CEO of Ripple, which is behind the third largest cryptocurrency in the world.

Zhao Changpeng represents Morocco. He is the CEO of Binance, one of the largest cryptocurrency exchanges in the world.

Tim Draper is playing for Iran. Draper is an American venture capital investor and crypto bull.

John McAfee will play for Portugal. Highly enthusiastic for crypto, McAfee is willing to go to the extreme to represent cryptocurrencies.

Tyler Winklevoss is Spain. One of the infamous Winklevoss twins, Tyler and his brother became two of the first known Bitcoin billionaires.

Charles Hoskinson hails for France. Hoskinson is the face behind Cardano. Will he be the face behind the Crypto World Cup?

Tiffany Hayden represents Australia. Hayden is a blockchain influencer and crypto enthusiast.

Vitalik Buterin is Argentina. Best known as the co-founder of Ethereum, Buterin is also the co-founder of Bitcoin Magazine.

Nick Szabo is playing for Iceland. Szabo is a crypto influencer who has done a lot of research into the space.

Apolo Ohno represents Peru. An Olympic athlete turned crypto player, Ohno is the founder of the cryptocurrency trading ecosystem HybridBlock.

Bill Barhydt will play for Denmark. Barhydt is the founder and CEO of Abra, a digital crypto wallet app.

Charlie Lee is Croatia. Lee created the cryptocurrency Litecoin (LTC) and has recently become a part of the creation of Magical Crypto Friends, a show all about the wonder of crypto.

Barry Silbert is Nigeria. Silbert is the founder and CEO of Digital Currency Group, a venture capital company focused on cryptocurrency and blockchain technology.

Dan Larimer represents Costa Rica. Larimer is the CTO of EOS, but he got his start with BitShares and co-founding Steemit.

Jamie Dimon plays for Serbia. Dimon is on the critical side of crypto, but what would be a fight without a few bears?

Roger Ver is Germany. An early investor in Bitcoin startups, Ver hails as the CEO of Bitcoin.com and is a strong pusher behind Bitcoin Cash (BCH).

Brian Armstrong represents Mexico. Armstrong has made his mark on crypto as the CEO of crypto exchange Coinbase.

Cameron Winklevoss is Brazil. Cameron Winklevoss, together with his twin brother Tyler are behind the Gemini crypto exchange.

David Schwartz is playing for Switzerland. Schwartz is the chief cryptographer at Ripple.

Willy Woo will be Sweden. An avid crypto enthusiast, Woo writers for CoinDesk.

Anthony Pompliano is South Korea. Pompliano is a strong backer and believer in crypto, and long-time writer of crypto Medium posts.

Satoshi Nakamoto represents Belgium. The name ascribed to the creator of Bitcoin, Nakamoto’s true identity may be a secret, but their game won’t be.

Tom Lee is kicking for Panama. Wall Street analyst Tom Lee has been on both sides of the crypto battle but tends to err towards pro.

Jed McCaleb is Tunisia. Starting at Ripple, McCaleb parted ways in 2013 and created Stellar, where he is now CTO.

Justin Sun plays for England. He’s the face behind TRON (TRX) and will always be making announcements about announcements.

Warren Buffett represents Colombia. One of the biggest crypto bears out there, no match would be complete without Buffett taking a shot at crypto.

Andreas Antonopoulos is Japan. Antonopoulos hosts the podcast Let’s Talk Bitcoin where he advocates for the digital currency.

Don Tapscott is playing for Poland. Tapscott is a crypto bull that’s all for blockchain becoming the wave of the future.

Jack Dorsey is Senegal. As the CEO of Twitter, you may not immediately connect Dorsey with crypto, but he has repeatedly shown off what a fan of Bitcoin he is.

>> Check out the Crypto Olympics

Crypto World Cup: The Matches

Our crypto representatives will be playing according to the match lineup of the FIFA World Cup. Each day there are matches, we will publish an article summing up all the games and their outcomes.

Here are the first three matchdays, which will be happening over the course of June 14th to June 28th. Each matchday will consist of the crypto representatives playing three times, against three different crypto representatives. Teams that do the best move into the next round, which starts June 30th.

Crypto World Cup

Crypto World Cup

Crypto World Cup

Crypto World Cup

Crypto World Cup

Crypto World Cup

Who will move onto the next round? Who will win the Crypto World Cup?

Tell us your guesses in the comments below.

Don’t forget to tune in tomorrow for our first match: CryptoYoda vs. David Sønstebø!

>> The Crypto Oscars

Featured image: Canva

If You Liked This Article Click To Share

!function(f,b,e,v,n,t,s)if(f.fbq)return;n=f.fbq=function()n.callMethod?
n.callMethod.apply(n,arguments):n.queue.push(arguments);if(!f._fbq)f._fbq=n;
n.push=n;n.loaded=!0;n.version=’2.0′;n.queue=[];t=b.createElement(e);t.async=!0;
t.src=v;s=b.getElementsByTagName(e)[0];s.parentNode.insertBefore(t,s)(window,
document,’script’,’https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/fbevents.js’);
fbq(‘init’, ‘894368744004449’);
fbq(‘init’, ‘447469122301599’);
fbq(‘init’, ‘1763072463990516’);
fbq(‘track’, ‘PageView’);

(function(d, s, id)
var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];
if (d.getElementById(id)) return;
js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id;
js.src = “http://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.6”;
fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);
(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’));

Go to Top
%d bloggers like this: