#1 Source for BlockChain News

Category archive

Blockchain 101

Public vs Private Blockchain | Ernst & Young’s New Blockchain Prototype

On October 30th, Ernst & Young (EY) announced a world-first for distributed ledgers. Called the Ernst & Young Ops Chain Public Edition, the company created a new blockchain prototype that combines the security of the public ledger model with the privacy of the private ledger model—thus a private blockchain.

It does this by using zero-knowledge proof (ZKP) technology on the public Ethereum blockchain. The result, it claims, is a network that will suit the needs of institutions, especially in the financial sector.

But why the need to combine the pro’s of both networks, what’s missing?

The Benefits and Problems of a Public Blockchain, Compared to Private

Anyone is able to join a public blockchain and read or write transactions. As a result, public blockchains are made up of hundreds of thousands of independent computers known as ‘nodes.’ This massive ecosystem means resilience and security—a huge positive of this blockchain model. Bitcoin and Ethereum are well-known examples of this type of blockchain.

However, every transaction on this type of ledger must be verified by each node. And with hundreds of thousands of nodes making up the network, this has become an issue.

It’s an issue because to reach consensus or verification, nodes perform a proof-of-work (PoW). A PoW is a complex cryptographic equation that is solved by the computer. Therefore, transaction times can be slow and costly and this becomes especially evident during times of high activity and volume.

This is given the term scalability, and it refers to a network’s ability to handle and process large numbers of transactions at any given time. Until scalability improves on public blockchains, many enterprises are reluctant to use them.

Another issue facing public blockchains is privacy. Each transaction provides details such as the amount, date, sender address and receiver address. This is visible to anyone on the network. Though many users love this type of transparency for safety reasons, institutions or anyone dealing in larger sums, lack business privacy.

>> Winklevoss Lawsuit Continues; Lawyer States Defendant Committed ‘No Misconduct’

The Benefits and Problems of a Private Blockchain, Compared to Public

A user must be invited to a private blockchain. As such, the network is considered closed or exclusive and can be referred to as permissioned blockchains. Naturally enough, this network model has fewer members than a public blockchain and so can be more vulnerable to hacking.

If a blockchain is fully private, then the network rules are usually controlled by one organization or by several pre-selected nodes. A consensus is reached not by every member on the network but by the selected group of nodes.

Because private blockchains are just that, private, they are well-suited to business and enterprise adoptions. Transactions are only visible to the limited numbers of invited participants.

Hyperledger is a good example of this type of blockchain. R3 is another, being a global banking and financial institution blockchain consortium based on their distributed ledger technology product, Corda.

However, as stated, what private blockchains gain in privacy, they lack in security. With far fewer nodes on the network, manipulation and/or hacking is far more plausible.

Conclusion

There are the two basic blockchain models in a nutshell. Can Ernst & Young’s new prototype truly solve the scalability issue of a large distributed ledger whilst also providing maximum security and privacy to its users? Sounds almost too good to be true, right?

Featured Image: Depositphotos/© kataklinger

If You Liked This Article Click To Share

!function(f,b,e,v,n,t,s)if(f.fbq)return;n=f.fbq=function()n.callMethod?
n.callMethod.apply(n,arguments):n.queue.push(arguments);if(!f._fbq)f._fbq=n;
n.push=n;n.loaded=!0;n.version=’2.0′;n.queue=[];t=b.createElement(e);t.async=!0;
t.src=v;s=b.getElementsByTagName(e)[0];s.parentNode.insertBefore(t,s)(window,
document,’script’,’https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/fbevents.js’);
fbq(‘init’, ‘894368744004449’);
fbq(‘init’, ‘447469122301599’);
fbq(‘init’, ‘1763072463990516’);
fbq(‘track’, ‘PageView’);

(function(d, s, id)
var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];
if (d.getElementById(id)) return;
js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id;
js.src = “http://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.6”;
fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);
(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’));

Top Blockchain Disruptions | Turning The Financial Industry On Its Head

The financial industry has witnessed many disruptions and welcomed new technologies that have radically changed traditional processes. In today’s world of cryptocurrency and digital transactions, a new type of technology is steadily taking over – the blockchain technology. Blockchain has caused many disruptions, but what are the top blockchain disruptions?

Blockchain technology is causing financial institutions to take note and consider alternative methods to the traditional processes they have come to rely on, such as online transactions.

Blockchain technology facilitates online transactions. These transactions are encrypted and processed over a decentralized peer-to-peer network. Encryption means that the transactions are secure, and the peer-to-peer network means there is no middleman. This is why blockchain transactions are much quicker.

Furthermore, as blockchain transactions are kept on a public ledger, the details are available for anyone to see and thus they cannot be refuted. As you can see, this type of online transaction has many benefits compared to its traditional counterpart. Businesses where transparency and honesty are important, such as online casinos, can especially benefit from the unchangeable, publically visible digital ledger that blockchain can provide.

Due to the speed, security, and convenience of blockchain technology, many industries have started testing ways that it can be used. In the cybersecurity industry, for example, REMME has explored the potential of using it as a form of authentication, removing the need for passwords.

Furthermore, in supply chain management, British Airways has trialled blockchain technology to manage flight data between several big cities, including London and Miami.

Alternatively, this technology has actually been used to create a secure voting system. Sierra Leone’s government used a blockchain-based voting system to ensure a public voting that was free from corruption and falsified results.

These are just a few examples of the disruptions that blockchain technology is causing. As you will see in the infographic below, there are many more. This type of technology is set to make inroads in many industries and should only see an increase in use as it is developed further.

Here are the top blockchain disruptions.

top blockchain disruptions
Source: Bitfortune

Featured image: Bitfortune

If You Liked This Article Click To Share

!function(f,b,e,v,n,t,s)if(f.fbq)return;n=f.fbq=function()n.callMethod?
n.callMethod.apply(n,arguments):n.queue.push(arguments);if(!f._fbq)f._fbq=n;
n.push=n;n.loaded=!0;n.version=’2.0′;n.queue=[];t=b.createElement(e);t.async=!0;
t.src=v;s=b.getElementsByTagName(e)[0];s.parentNode.insertBefore(t,s)(window,
document,’script’,’https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/fbevents.js’);
fbq(‘init’, ‘894368744004449’);
fbq(‘init’, ‘447469122301599’);
fbq(‘init’, ‘1763072463990516’);
fbq(‘track’, ‘PageView’);

(function(d, s, id)
var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0];
if (d.getElementById(id)) return;
js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id;
js.src = “http://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.6”;
fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);
(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’));

Go to Top
%d bloggers like this: